suspicious key found

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suspicious key found

Janne Inkilä
I made a key search with my name and found something suspicious.

The search:

https://pgp.mit.edu/pks/lookup?search=janne+inkila&op=index&fingerprint=on

I have used my old key since 2007. Fingerprint F4DB 40F8 BF22 8B9D 9B8F  
F679 A482 4C9A 033E 22A2. I know this is quite old key and maybe I
should revoke it.

BUT

I also found another key with fingerprint 87C4 F4C8 16D1 3CC3 03E0 7977
1A9C 6259 033E 22A2. The key ID is the same 033E 22A2 on both keys.
There's also signatures in this key. Looks like same persons and same
key ID's but fingerprints doesn't match. For some reason this key has
been revoked.

Did someone really generated same looking key? And why? Any ideas?
Someone tries to capture my emails? I would like to see some sort of
theory what is going on, thanks :)

Janne Inkilä

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Re: suspicious key found

Felix Winterhalter
There was a proof of concept attack on the fingerprints a couple of
years ago. The keys were revoked afterwards.

TL;DR short key fingerprints are not secure at all. Also the web of
trust is your friend here.

Cheers,

Felix


On 16/05/17 15:47, Janne Inkilä wrote:

> I made a key search with my name and found something suspicious.
>
> The search:
>
> https://pgp.mit.edu/pks/lookup?search=janne+inkila&op=index&fingerprint=on 
>
>
> I have used my old key since 2007. Fingerprint F4DB 40F8 BF22 8B9D
> 9B8F  F679 A482 4C9A 033E 22A2. I know this is quite old key and maybe
> I should revoke it.
>
> BUT
>
> I also found another key with fingerprint 87C4 F4C8 16D1 3CC3 03E0
> 7977 1A9C 6259 033E 22A2. The key ID is the same 033E 22A2 on both
> keys. There's also signatures in this key. Looks like same persons and
> same key ID's but fingerprints doesn't match. For some reason this key
> has been revoked.
>
> Did someone really generated same looking key? And why? Any ideas?
> Someone tries to capture my emails? I would like to see some sort of
> theory what is going on, thanks :)
>
> Janne Inkilä
>
> _______________________________________________
> Gnupg-users mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://lists.gnupg.org/mailman/listinfo/gnupg-users


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Re: suspicious key found

Andrew Gallagher
In reply to this post by Janne Inkilä
On 2017/05/16 14:47, Janne Inkilä wrote:
> Did someone really generated same looking key? And why? Any ideas?

Yes, they did. Most of the strong set was duplicated by the Evil32
project in order to demonstrate the danger of relying on short key IDs
(because on modern hardware it takes mere seconds to generate a fake key
with the same short ID). Unfortunately the fake keys got uploaded to an
SKS server and polluted the database. The authors then mass-revoked all
the offending keys, but since SKS is append-only they still appear in
search results.

https://evil32.com/

The fact that invalid (even suspicious) keys exist on the SKS servers
(or anywhere on the internet for that matter) is in itself not a problem
- any decent public-key infrastructure must be designed under the
assumption that forgeries are inevitable and use some other method
(signatures, out of band verification) to determine the validity of keys.

The moral of the story is: don't believe everything you see on the
internet. ;-)

Andrew.


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Re: suspicious key found

David Shaw
In reply to this post by Janne Inkilä
On May 16, 2017, at 9:47 AM, Janne Inkilä <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> I made a key search with my name and found something suspicious.
>
> The search:
>
> https://pgp.mit.edu/pks/lookup?search=janne+inkila&op=index&fingerprint=on
>
> I have used my old key since 2007. Fingerprint F4DB 40F8 BF22 8B9D 9B8F  F679 A482 4C9A 033E 22A2. I know this is quite old key and maybe I should revoke it.
>
> BUT
>
> I also found another key with fingerprint 87C4 F4C8 16D1 3CC3 03E0 7977 1A9C 6259 033E 22A2. The key ID is the same 033E 22A2 on both keys. There's also signatures in this key. Looks like same persons and same key ID's but fingerprints doesn't match. For some reason this key has been revoked.
>
> Did someone really generated same looking key? And why? Any ideas? Someone tries to capture my emails? I would like to see some sort of theory what is going on, thanks :)

There are many such fake keys on the keyservers.  I have one as well.  It's trivial to forge the short (8 hex digit) key ID - just keep generating keys over and over until you match the lower 32 bits.  Note that the fingerprints do not match, as there is no (current) way to forge an entire fingerprint.

See https://evil32.com - they made the keys as a demonstration, but didn't upload them.  It's an excellent demonstration why people should never trust the short key ID for anything.

David


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